In these unusual times, there seems to be an increased impact on disadvantaged communities. In a recent article, the Mayor of London stated that coronavirus ‘is discriminating – targeting the elderly, those with underlying health conditions and BAME communities’ with ‘poor health often a product of inadequate housing, overcrowding and poverty’. However, does public housing really have a detrimental impact on the well-being of communities?
The internet offers seemingly endless possibilities- whether it’s another Zoom date with friends, posting on social media groups, playing games, or sharing our work online- but at the same time, there’s a certain sense of emptiness that comes with limiting your social interactions to a screen. Perhaps this is a chance to rediscover and redefine what staying connected means to us on a deeper level. Let's have a looks at some existing design solutions offered.
Now that most of us are working, living, exercising and doing anything and everything from home, we are experiencing the impact of the design of our living environments on our well-being, both physically and mentally more than ever. Things we overlooked in our homes, like the little balcony which we thought was a nice addition to the flat, has now become our main living space, an essential part of our well-being amidst self-isolation. But can design really make us happier and healthier? Research shows that 1 in 4 people is likely to suffer from depression each year in the UK. How is our built environment responding to the physical and mental wellbeing requirements of occupants? What do regulations say (and don't say)?
New, exciting exhibition at the Welsh School of Architecture signals not only an upgrade on the formula of one of the School's more divisive modules, but also, hopefully, a beginning of the new tradition.